Category: Yamaha yr5

Two earlier generations of sporting cc and larger displacement air-cooled two strokes preceded the R5 dating back to Yamaha began producing air-cooled "sport tuned" cc twin cylinder roadsters in Development led to increased capacity in to cc YM1 and in to cc YR1.

These are the ancestral predecessors to the cc R5 and represent two different generations of engine evolution and design. Several technical changes were made to the RD platform, the most significant were the six speed transmission and reed valve induction.

The main difference being the cylinders became water-cooled. The engine cases are similar enough, that with modifications, they can be interchanged. Two-stroke street motorcycles from Yamaha, Suzuki and Kawasaki collectively developed a reputation as "giant-killers". Because of the lighter weight of the engine and chassis, two-strokes were typically dominant on curved roads.

During the '70s, the two stroke developments were between Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha. At this time, Soichiro Honda was alive and active in his company. He did not personally like two strokes, so Honda stayed focused on four-strokes. As the decade went by, Suzuki added displacement, cylinders, and water cooling, culminating in the GT, a touring bike. Kawasaki added cylinders and displacement, ending with the infamous H2 mark IV. In the early days of the Yamaha racing team, factory race bikes were not as specialized as they are now.

In fact, they were hand-built versions of the production street bikes. Beginning with the basic parts of an R5, the racing TR3 model was built. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved 8 November Categories : Yamaha motorcycles Two-stroke motorcycles Motorcycles powered by straight-twin engines Motorcycles introduced in the s.

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Views Read Edit View history. Languages Add links. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.And Yamaha?

Besides a smorgasbord of small-bore bikes from Italy, England and Germany, there was a full plate of small bikes available from Japan, including Yamaha. ByYamaha had emerged as one of the leading Japanese motorcycle makers, behind Honda but ahead of Kawasaki and Suzuki.

While Honda continued to embrace the 4-stroke ideal, Yamaha, like its other Rising Sun rivals, was still putting most of its faith in 2-stroke technology. That was followed a year later with the all new YR1 Grand Prix, whose short-stroke cc twin benefited heavily from lessons learned on the track, and finally, inthe YR5, or the Yamaha R5 as it was known in the states. For the average rider, this was a huge improvement.

yamaha yr5

Gone were the days of having to rev the engine to a scream before slipping the clutch to achieve any sort of smooth, low-speed take-off — or to pull cleanly once on the move.

Home Manufacturer Contact. Yamaha R5-A Make Model. R - Bore x Stroke. Compression Ratio. Co oling System. Air cooled. Oil System. Oil injection. Battery, dual coils, breaker points. Max Power. Max Torque. Multi-plate, wet. Final Drive. Gear Ratios. Duplex cradle frame. Front Suspension. Telescopic fork. Rear Suspension. Front Brakes. Drum, twin leading shoe.Yamaha YR5. Rear Suspension Dual shock absorbers preload adjustable. The R5 had port induction for the intake and the RD had reed-valves.

The main difference being the cylinders became water-cooled. The engine cases are similar enough, that with modifications, they can be interchanged. Memories can be so misleading. As I turned on the cc twin's ignition and unfolded the kickstart for the first time, my head was already spinning with thoughts of good times aboard previous Yamaha two-strokes.

Yamaha YR5 information

The acceleration of my old race-tuned RDC; the brilliant LC that I once thrashed across Europe; the spine-tingling scream of a Power Valve with its throttle wound back to the stop. This time wasn't quite like that. But when I came to a straight and cracked open the throttle, the Yamaha's acceleration was gentle rather than dramatic. And when I reached the first good bend, my expectations of nimble handling were shattered by the reality of this bike's grabby front brake, diving forks, and rather vague steering.

That's what happens when you mix memories of bikes spanning over a decade. Or, even worse, when you fall into the trap of judging a classic machine by modern standards.

This Yam was in good. Expecting it to provide blood-curdling acceleration all these years later was just a little unfair. The YR5—known simply as the R5 in the States—was a real star in its day, though. Yamaha came late to four-stroke super-bikes, releasing its debut model, the XS, only in But the firm's dynasty of two-stroke middleweights provided some of the great bikes of the Seventies and Eighties, with a near-unbeatable blend of performance and value.

And while the RD and the later, liquid-cooled LCs are more familiar to most riders, the models that started the legend were the air-cooled RD and the YR5, its look-alike predecessor. Inthe year the this model was launched, Rod Gould won Yamaha's fourth cc world championship, following fellow Brit Phil Read's three titles in the Sixties. Its design could be traced back to the YR1 ofand was shaped both by racetrack development and by Yamaha's smaller roadsters.

The YR5 was the biggest of a visually near-identical family of, and cc twins. Like the smaller models, the YR5 used a piston-ported, degree crankshaft motor, in this case with dimensions of 64 x 54 mm for a capacity of cc.

Yamaha claimed that the YR5's steel, twin-downtube frame was designed using knowledge gained through racing, where privateer Yams were already becoming popular.And Yamaha?

Besides a smorgasbord of small-bore bikes from Italy, England and Germany, there was a full plate of small bikes available from Japan, including Yamaha. ByYamaha had emerged as one of the leading Japanese motorcycle makers, behind Honda but ahead of Kawasaki and Suzuki. While Honda continued to embrace the 4-stroke ideal, Yamaha, like its other Rising Sun rivals, was still putting most of its faith in 2-stroke technology.

That was followed a year later with the all new YR1 Grand Prix, whose short-stroke cc twin benefited heavily from lessons learned on the track, and finally, inthe YR5, or the Yamaha R5 as it was known in the states.

For the average rider, this was a huge improvement. Gone were the days of having to rev the engine to a scream before slipping the clutch to achieve any sort of smooth, low-speed take-off — or to pull cleanly once on the move.

Yet with the throttle cracked wide open it would run as fast as bikes twice its size. Get the revs up over four grand, and the R5 became a different machine — and it produced performance numbers to prove it, consistently running the quarter mile in the low 14 second range. The chassis is absolutely rock steady.

So much so that the rider gets a distinct impression that the wheels are running in a slot. Although no featherweight, at pounds dry it was hardly a porker. And with a relatively short So much so the folks at Cycle World found themselves wishing Yamaha would stretch the bike out a bit to help keep the front end on the ground. Testers hardly complained, and in fact asserted that an electric starter would be wasted on the R5, given its propensity to fire easily and immediately first time every time, regardless of conditions.

350 Yamaha YR5 Moto légende 2013

Power was routed through a slick-shifting 5-speed transmission universally praised for short, precise shift throws, while a twin-leading-shoe drum brake up front and single-leading-shoe drum in back pulled the R5 to a stop.

Yamaha wisely changed little on the R5 during its three-year production. With the exception of a larger taillight for and different color options, the R5 was the same as the model. As fast as the market was changing, Yamaha still appreciated the value of continuity.

yamaha yr5

True, body parts are getting hard to find, but growing interest in the model coupled with a surprisingly high survivorship mean you can usually find whatever parts you need to keep your incher on the road. When Honda introduced the new for Honda CB and its CL Scrambler variant at its annual dealer convention, every single dealer stood up and applauded.

And not just because they liked how it looked; they could see instantly that this was a bike that would make them money, and lots of it.

The CB was a truly modern machine. Instead of the ring-dingy and smoky 2-stroke found in most small bikes, the had a positively exquisite OHC 4-stroke twin that redlined at an incredible 10,rpm — and it would do so willingly — yet would pull happily almost from idle. The CB provided cheap but sophisticated power for the masses, and buyers flocked to Honda dealers. Over a six-year production run, more thanCBs rolled out of Honda dealerships and onto the highways and byways of the U.

Outside of the expected yearly color options, Honda changed little on the Transmission gear ratios were subtly altered for with wider and more even spacing between gears, and the redline was brought down to 9,rpm, a belated recognition of the fact that many riders were routinely over-revving the twin. A disc front brake came inbut otherwise Honda left the alone.

Better known as a tire manufacturer, Japanese Bridgestone first got into the motorcycle game in Developed specifically for U. Performance on the strip and the street was impressive, with quarter-mile times in the low 14s and a top speed of around 95mph from the rubber-mounted 37hp 2-stroke twin.

Technical innovations included aluminum cylinders with hard chrome facing for tighter tolerances and a 6-speed gearbox. GTR owners also had the unique option of swapping the shift lever and rear brake lever to give left or right gear change. The story goes that Bridgestone was eventually pressed out of the motorcycle business by Honda, who suggested the company should decide if it was more profitable to keep supplying Honda tires or building motorcycles.

yamaha yr5

A combination of relative rarity there were only around 9, made and high owner loyalty have kept prices relatively high.And Yamaha? Besides a smorgasbord of small-bore bikes from Italy, England and Germany, there was a full plate of small bikes available from Japan, including Yamaha. ByYamaha had emerged as one of the leading Japanese motorcycle makers, behind Honda but ahead of Kawasaki and Suzuki. While Honda continued to embrace the 4-stroke ideal, Yamaha, like its other Rising Sun rivals, was still putting most of its faith in 2-stroke technology.

That was followed a year later with the all new YR1 Grand Prix, whose short-stroke cc twin benefited heavily from lessons learned on the track, and finally, inthe YR5, or the Yamaha R5 as it was known in the states.

For the average rider, this was a huge improvement. Gone were the days of having to rev the engine to a scream before slipping the clutch to achieve any sort of smooth, low-speed take-off — or to pull cleanly once on the move. Yet with the throttle cracked wide open it would run as fast as bikes twice its size.

Get the revs up over four grand, and the R5 became a different machine — and it produced performance numbers to prove it, consistently running the quarter mile in the low 14 second range. The chassis is absolutely rock steady. So much so that the rider gets a distinct impression that the wheels are running in a slot. Although no featherweight, at pounds dry it was hardly a porker. And with a relatively short So much so the folks at Cycle World found themselves wishing Yamaha would stretch the bike out a bit to help keep the front end on the ground.

Testers hardly complained, and in fact asserted that an electric starter would be wasted on the R5, given its propensity to fire easily and immediately first time every time, regardless of conditions.

Power was routed through a slick-shifting 5-speed transmission universally praised for short, precise shift throws, while a twin-leading-shoe drum brake up front and single-leading-shoe drum in back pulled the R5 to a stop.

Yamaha wisely changed little on the R5 during its three-year production. With the exception of a larger taillight for and different color options, the R5 was the same as the model. As fast as the market was changing, Yamaha still appreciated the value of continuity.

Yamaha R5 Wossner Forged Piston Kit

True, body parts are getting hard to find, but growing interest in the model coupled with a surprisingly high survivorship mean you can usually find whatever parts you need to keep your incher on the road.Discussion in ' 2 smokers ' started by LasseNCJul 2, Log in or Join.

Adventure Rider. Dismiss Notice. Become a site supporter for a free shirt and ad free viewing. Yamaha R5what is it like? LasseNCJul 2, Hello Considering bidding on an R5, but what are they like to live with? I haven't found any forums for them, so what is the spares situation like? Would like some input :. Wheelhorse1 likes this.

JonnyCashJul 2, I've got an RD, and I absolutely love it. The differences are mainly that the R5 is piston ported and the RD is reed valved. What that means is that the R5 has a more abrupt powerband, but they're not really all that different. I love the R5's look, better than the RD's, but that's just me. I believe that pistons are a lot more expensive then RD's, but other than that, I can't think of anything to warn you about.

The two bikes are very similar, and you can swap parts around a lot. An RD top end will bolt on, if you really want the reed valves. Go for it! You might want to go over to 2strokeworld.

Lots of great folks over there.

The Yamaha R5 350 Twin

ADV Sponsors. Can you spot something totally off on this bike? Unoriginal parts, things are modified. Bike in question:. I had a Yamaha R5 as my first bike. What a fantastic first bike too Carry extra plugs, keep it oiled properly, and mind the pipe.

They are good fun, but the brakes are good for only one good stop. Then you need to let them cool down a little before grabbing a handful again. Mine was orange and black too. Thanks for dialing up the wayback for me.

Only because you askedExhaust pipes and handle bars are not oe. Probably and hopefully re jetted for the pipes. The low bars are for a more cafe profile. Quick bikeSunday blasts and surprising the cruisers ,might be tedious as a daily driver.

DaveBallJul 2, Had one of those R5s back in the day. Raced the crap out of it for a couple of years in the Pacific North West. Fast as hell, just couldn't slow down.Make Yamaha. Model YZF-R. This is a Yamaha Yzf R1 with sooo many extras. The bike has miles on it!!! NEVER loose a second on or off the track!!!

I also put on a 3 quarter turn Vortex gas cap so easy to turn on and off when the vapors build up in your tank!!!!! No more fighting to turn the cap!!!! If You have Any questions feel free to ask!!!! Sooo many extra sets of clutch and brake levers!!!

Model R5. I have for sale my fully restored Yamaha R5. I've had this bike for almost two years - and have fully enjoyed brining it back to life. I've decided to list the motorcycle at this time because eBay has offered a free insertion fee promotion - although it needs new coils.

I have been running the originals, and during one of my bi-weekly start ups, had no spark, and traced the problem. I'm currently doing some research on the most reliable brand will most likely purchase from HVC Cycle in Nebraska If you are interested in purchasing the bike please reach out to me, as I would want to have the bike running perfectly, and retuned before completing the sale.

I'm also open to working with you on shipping or storing the bike after purchase. It was a blast to ride around this past summer on short runs. I do know it is still winter, and many people are not in the market for a bike - but with the rarity and collector value this motorcycle has, I thought it would be worth listing it a little early, and getting it on some fellow enthusiasts radar.

Don't hesitate to reach out to me with any questions you may have. I have listed it at a fixed price - but I am open to offers. This bike is as classic 70's cool as it gets. Two stroke, all original, under 7k miles. Runs and drives perfect, tons of general maintenance done by previous owner a few years ago, new tires, battery, tune up last fall.

No issues with the transmission, engine runs strong, and the frame is in exceptional shape. I think it has a really cool patina and haven't had anything re-chromed. The motorcycle does not have mirrors and has some paint fading on the top of the gas tank. The fuel petcock works but sometimes gets stuck so will probably need to be replaced unless you don't mind wiggling it a few times.

Bike is currently registered in CT so transfer won't be an issue. Model R5B. I pulled this Yamaha R5 out of a barn a few years ago. It has roughly 9, miles on it. It was completely stock but the paint was faded and needed everything gone through.

Here is the short list Engine has been rebuilt with Wossner pistons - Boring done by Chuck Quenzler Supertune Heads has been shaved and squish corrected with O-ring sealed heads. If you know 2 strokes you will love the way this bike bike hits the power band. Will come with premix gas can, ratio rite cup, motorcycle cover all stock parts that are left.

These older 2 strokes are getting increasingly hard to find and are rising in value. Model R5b.

yamaha yr5

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